Coil Binding

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Coil binding is a style of binding that uses a spring-like coil to bind a book. Coil binding is often referred to as spiral binding. Coil binding is one of the more popular methods of binding today. Properties of coil binders are that pages turn easily, the book will lay flat and it's very durable with excellent crush resistance.

WHY BIND?

People bind because bound documents are bound documents are smart and user friendly which is necessary in a business presentation, so it creates a professional image. Binding protects the document and makes it easier to use again and again, which makes them great for reference.

WHAT TYPES OF COIL BINDERS ARE THERE?

Coil binding machines come in a variety of sizes which are affected by the volume that they can bind. They are usually categorized as low-, medium or high-volume and as being manual or electric. Low volume machines are typically used for home or occasional binding. Mid-volume is for binding a few books a day; while high-volume can bind dozens to hundreds of books a day.
Coil binders are available with either a manual punch or an electric punch. The format used is really up to the person using the machine. Some people don't mind pulling a lever to punch paper, some prefer to have both hands free for binding and prefer to use an electric push. Most high-volume machines use a motor for punching paper. Electric coil binders tend to have a lower capacity than manual ones.
Also, some binding machines include an electric coil inserted. This saves time, but is not necessary if you are binding a few books a day. Most low- to med-volume coil binding machines require you to manually insert coils. Machines with a coil inserter will quickly spin the coils through the holes for you.

OFFICE OR PERSONAL BINDER?

A personal, small binder is perfect for desktop use and is easy to store. Office machines have higher capacity and more features, so they are preferable for shared use in a central location.

Coil binding equipment

There are three important pieces of equipment for binding documents with spiral coils. First, a punch creates holes along the edge of the document. Second, a coil inserter spins the coils through the holes. Third, a pair of coil crimping pliers or a crimping machine is used to cut off the excess coil and crimp the end to prevent the coil from coming loose from the document. Light volume or personal users may choose to buy a single machine that does all of these features or may even choose to spin the coils onto their books by hand. Higher volume users will often choose to separate these three functions to help increase productivity.

Coil binding diameters

Coil binding spines are normally measured in millimeters and not inches. Coils are available in sizes as small as 6mm (1/4") and as large as 63mm depending on the pitch of coil chosen. However it is important to note that binding thick documents using spiral coil can be difficult. When a large document is punched for coil binding the path through the holes will be straight. However, the coil binding spines are curved. This means that it is necessary to shape the spine of the document into a curve in order to allow the coil to travel smoothly through the holes. Special tools are generally used for this purpose.

Coil binding colors

Spiral coil binding supplies are also available in a wide variety of colors. In fact there are more than sixty standard colors available for binding documents with spiral coil. This makes spiral coil binding an excellent choice for marketing agencies and design firms that want to match the spine of the document to a specific color palette. It is even possible to get a PMS color match for organizations that want their spines to match the exact colors used in their printed materials.


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References


Coil Binding
Youtube




Wire Binding
Wire binding
Is one of the most popular commercial book binding methods used in North America and is known by a number of different names including twin loop wire, Wire-o, double loop wire, double-o, ring wire and wirebind. With this binding method, users insert their punched pages onto a "C" shaped spine and then use a wire closer to squeeze the spine until it is round.[1]. Documents that are bound with wire binding will open completely flat on a desk and allow for 360 degree rotation of bound pages.


Wire binding process

Binding documents using the double loop wire involves ten basic steps. These steps include ...
  1. Assemble your document including covers and measure the book to determine the correct size of spine.
  2. Set up your binding machine so that the holes are correctly centered on your paper.
  3. Separate your document into appropriate sections and punch it using your wire binding machine or modular binding punch.
  4. Hang the pages of your document onto the "C" shaped wire spines.
  5. After carefully moving the pages of your document over to the wire closer, use the machine to squeeze the spine together until the "C" shape becomes an "O" shape.

Wire binding equipment

In order to bind documents with double loop wire a binding machine and a wire closer are required. Smaller organizations will often choose a small manual wire binding machine that offers a manual hole punch and a built in wire closer. Medium sized users will often choose a wire binding machine with an electric punch and built in wire closer. The highest volume wire binding users such as binderies, print shops and in-plant printers will usually separate the punching and finishing stages of the binding process in order to increase productivity. These users will often use a heavy duty modular interchangeable die punch or an automated punching system along with either a manual or an electric wire closing machine.




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References


Wire Binding
Youtube



Comb Binding

Comb binding
Is one of many ways to bind pages together into a book. This method utilizes round plastic spines with 19 rings (for US Letter size) or 21 rings (for A4 size) and a hole puncher that makes rectangular holes. Comb binding is sometimes referred to as plastic comb binding or spiral comb binding.

Binding process

To bind a document, the user first punches holes in the paper with a specialized hole punch. Pages must be punched a few at a time with most of these machines. If hard covers are desired, they must be punched as well. In bulk applications, a paper drilling machine may be used.
Then the user chooses a spine size that will match the document. Standard sizes are 3/16 inch (for 10 sheets of 20# paper) up to 2 inches (for 425 sheets). Spine lengths are generally 11 inches to match the length of letter-size paper.
The rings on the spine open and insert into the holes in the page, then rest against the body of the spine, resulting in a closure that can be opened again for making changes to the book.
Spine capacity
Inches
Millimeters
Sheets of paper
3/16"
4mm
16
1/4"
6mm
25
5/16"
8mm
40
3/8"
10mm
55
7/16"
11mm
70
1/2"
12mm
85
9/16"
14mm
100
5/8"
16mm
125
3/4"
20mm
150
7/8"
22mm
175
1"
25mm
200
1⅛"
28mm
250
1¼"
32mm
275
1½"
38mm
325
1¾"
45mm
375
2"
51mm
425

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References


Comb Binding
Youtube


  • Manuel Gomez

  • Brittany Burgess